Analynk AP626 Explosion Proof Access Point Enclosure For Aruba AP-514

Analynk AP626

The Analynk AP626 is a hazardous area enclosure designed to house the Aruba AP-514 dual band access point. The enclosure and antennas are rated for Class 1, Div 1, groups C & D Hazardous Locations. All hardware, mounting plate, and RF cables are provided to make installation of the access point quick and easy. The enclosure includes four of our patented hazardous area 2.4GHz/5GHz antennas, the AP-514 is not included.

Ratings: Class I, Div 1 Groups, C & D
ATEX Zone 1 optional

Applications:

  • Pharmaceuticals
  • Oil refineries
  • Oil & Gas Platforms
  • Chemical Plants

Ordering information:

  • AP626
  • AP626-N4 (NEMA 4 rating)
  • AP626-ATEX
For more information call Analynk at 614-755-5091 or visit this web page.

Coming This June: Analynk's Hazardous Area 4G LTE Antenna

Hazardous Area 4G LTE Antenna

Analynk Wireless, an innovative manufacturer of hazardous area antennas and access point enclosures and wireless instrumentation for the process control industry, announced a 4G LTE antenna rated for Class I, Division 1 Groups C & D, ATEX, and IECEx Zone 1 areas.

4G, which stands for "Fourth Generation," is a standard developed by the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) in 2008, established explicitly by the ITU-R. (which deals with radio communications). Today, 4G is better known for its broadband capabilities and dramatically higher speed than 3G, which pioneered data access in the cellular space. 

The ITU standard mandated a minimum download speed of 100 Mbps, which was highly hypothetical at the time. In reality, several years later, carrier networks are only now realizing these goals. A wireless network must be capable of downloading at a rate of at least 100 Mbps to qualify as true 4G.

Analynk will introduce the new product this June 2021.

For more information, contact Analynk Wireless, LLC, 790 Cross Pointe Road, Columbus, OH 43230

Call them at 614-755-5091 or visit https://analynk.com.

Antennas Designed for Hazardous-Classified, Industrial Hardened Applications

Antennas Designed for Hazardous Areas

Wireless communication has seen increasing prevalence in the industrial process measurement and control field for several years.  It has provided years of reliable communications for monitoring and controlling processes, where using cables is either too costly or impractical. The absence of wires saves space, reduces the potential for damage, and simplifies modifications to the equipment layout. Implementing wireless communications in hazardous areas, whether through WiFi or other radio frequency channels, presents a particular set of challenges to successful implementation. Points of network access and further transmission and receiving equipment can require a level of isolation and hardening appropriate for the hazardous environment. In response to customers' desire to incorporate the technology across an ever-widening array of application scenarios, vendors continue developing and releasing new products and technologies that expand the potential for industrial wireless communication.

Many industrial process control operations can benefit from wireless connections between measurement and control devices. Analynk Wireless provides patented hazardous area explosion-proof antennas for industrial installations. Analynk antennas are operable across an extensive temperature range and provide substantial impact resistance, signal output, and third-party ratings for hazardous environments. These rugged antennas are for global application in the industrial process control field. Analynk hazardous area antennas are very robust and intended for industrial applications. All hazardous area antennas have UL listed Class I, Groups C and D, ATEX/IECEx Certification, and range of frequencies available- from 900MHz, 2.4GHz, and Cellular GPS, 4G, Iridium, and dual bands.

For more information, contact Analynk Wireless.
(614) 755-5091

IIoT Developments and Security Concerns

IIoT Developments and Security Concerns

Upward of 27 billion devices connect as part of the massive confluence of technologies, networks, protocols, standards, and devices known as the Internet of Things (IoT). IoT is a network of computers and devices that capture and exchange vast volumes of data, which is then sent to a cloud-based service, aggregated with other data, and then exchanged with end-users to provide valuable insights. IoT is growing automation in homes, classrooms, shops, and several other industries and industries. 

The Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) leverages many of the same technologies like IoT and applies them to the industrial world's diverse needs. IIoT is a category of technologies that capture and distribute data inside historically isolated industrial devices, contained in Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems and other Industrial Control Systems (ICS). They track and control essential industrial infrastructure, including factories, power plants, water systems, ports, other industrial installations, and some U.S.

Sensitive industrial infrastructure owners and operators are rapidly implementing IIoT technologies to maximize the development and distribution of goods and services, increase performance, improve safety and minimize costs. IIoT sensors and devices provide real-time monitoring and control to operators.  They also collect data on system output, further improving plant performance or production performance. For example, smart tools used on a production line could allow a company to monitor and evaluate its production process. Real-time production data could provide insight into plant conditions, discover additional plant capability, and predictive analytics can help detect corrosion within the refinery pipe.

These threats to modules, firmware and software, wireless networking, and most devices must include mitigation at the computer and system engineering level. The U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the European Union Agency for Cyber Security (ENISA) seek to guide the government and industry with some of their voluntary attempts to describe IIoT cybersecurity. Industry is collaborating with original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) and other manufacturers to establish reasonable safety capabilities in IIoT products to avoid burdensome regulations that are likely to quickly get out of date as the IIoT industry is vast and changing much faster compared to government legislation. 

Key Concerns

  • Critical infrastructure owners and operators are rapidly adopting the IIoT to boost performance and maximize productivity, but this technology also brings increased cyber and other vulnerabilities. 
  • The increased adoption of the IIoT, historically unsafe and isolated legacy systems come with new connected devices against a background of diverse yet growing safety standards for components, creates further possibilities for system access and eventual critical infrastructure access to the computer network by several malicious cyber players. 
  • The rise in publicly and commercially accessible cyber resources makes it easier for more players to access vulnerable IIoT components. These devices are contained in critical infrastructure, allowing them to seek a range of effects that may not be detected, and present financial and possibly physical consequences.

Evaluation of the Technologies Potentially Suitable for IWSAN Solutions Covering an Entire Industrial Site With Limited Infrastructure Cost and Trade-Offs

Wireless Technologies

An excellent 2020 publication from the National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine on industrial wireless technologies: