Showing posts with label Analynk. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Analynk. Show all posts

Safely Locate Your Aruba AP 318 in Hazardous Areas with this New Enclosure

Analynk AE902 Hazardous Area Access Point Enclosure
Analynk AE902 Hazardous Area Access Point Enclosure
Wi-Fi coverage is increasingly required in all areas of the modern industrial manufacturing plant. Adding wireless access points in non-hazardous areas, in an environmentally protected structure, is relatively simple. Many times the access point's own enclosure is all the protection required for that service.

On the other hand, creating a reliable wireless data transmission network in locations with dangerous concentrations of flammable gases or ignitable dust present unique network challenges. Industries such as off-shore drilling, petrochemical refining and mining require wireless networking components rated for use in hazardous areas.

Hardened access points, such as the Aruba Networks AP 318, are built for rugged environments. The AP 318 is capable of operating from -40 F. up to +140 F., and the unit's enclosure provides water and dust protection. However, if the access point is being located in a hazardous area (an area where flammable vapor, gas or dust exist) it will have to be mounted inside a hazardous area access point enclosure.

The Analynk AE902 Hazardous Area Access Point Enclosure provides the approvals and features required for hazardous area applications. Designed specifically to house the Aruba AP 318 access point, the AE902 enclosure allows facilitates the deployment of wireless networks in Class I, Division 2, groups A, B, C, & D areas, and combines protection for harsh, wet and corrosive environments. It includes a NEMA 4X rating to withstand driving rain, blowing sand, dust, splashing, and an occasional hose down. Finally, the AE902 comes complete with a PoE (Power over Ethernet) injector and AC to DC power supply for simplified wiring.

Introduction to WirelessHART

WirelessHART is a subset of the HART industrial instrument communication standard as of version 7, communicating process data over 2.4 GHz radio waves. Individual instruments communicate with a common “gateway” device serving as an interface between the wireless network and a wired network or a host control system. In addition to this, though, individual WirelessHART devices also form links with one another, so that the network data routes look like a “mesh” with all nearby nodes interconnected in addition to connecting with the gateway:

WirelessHART

In a mesh network, devices (nodes) perform double-duty as repeaters to relay data from other instruments to the gateway as needed. In other words, data transmitted from one WirelessHART instrument may not be directly received by the gateway device if that path is blocked or too far away. Instead, the data may “hop” from one device to another nearby, which then re-broadcasts that information to the gateway via a clearer path.

The purpose of a mesh network is to provide redundant data pathways in case of device failure or changes in the environment interrupting radio communication between devices. In this way, data packets may be re-routed to the gateway if the shortest route fails, in a manner similar to how Terminal Control Protocol (TCP) and Internet Protocol (IP) work together to route data segments from source to destination over the “mesh” of the Internet. This feature is often referred to in WirelessHART technical literature as the self-healing property of the mesh network.

According to the HART Foundation, reliability for a well-designed WirelessHART mesh network is 99.7300204% minimum, and typically greater than 99.9999998%.

With each WirelessHART field instrument capable of functioning as a radio repeater, the potential exists to form wireless networks larger in size than the maximum broadcast/reception range of any one device. This illustration shows what is possible:

WirelessHART
An important consideration when planning a WirelessHART network is battery life. With the main purpose of wireless field instruments being the elimination of wired connections to the host system, the field instruments cannot rely on a host system for their electrical power needs. Lithium-based batteries currently fulfill this role as primary power source, with life expectancies of several years. Interestingly, the amount of energy required by a WirelessHART device to transmit radio-frequency data is small compared to the energy required to power its essential instrument functions (e.g. pressure measurement, temperature measurement). This means a WirelessHART device operating as a radio repeater (in addition to being a measurement device) adds little burden to its battery.

Perhaps the greatest challenge in sustaining any wireless field instrument network is ensuring network integrity despite unending changes in the physical environment around the instruments. Remember that this is an industrial, field-instrument wireless network designed to be installed in less-than-ideal physical environments. These wireless devices must somehow reliably communicate with each other despite interference from high-power electrical devices (e.g. variable-frequency motor drive units), while mounted on or near metal objects such as girders, pipes, pipe racks, large vessels, motors, enclosures, shelters, and electrical conduits. Even the ground of an industrial environment can be an impediment to robust radio communication: steel-reinforced concrete and electrical grounding grids form what is essentially a solid “ground plane” that will interfere with WirelessHART devices mounted too close to ground level. Added to all this spatial complexity is the continual presence of large vehicles and other moving machines (cranes, forklifts, manlifts, etc.). It is not uncommon for scaffolding to be temporarily erected for maintenance work in industrial areas, presenting yet one more obstacle for RF signals.

In answer to these challenges is an integral and essential component of a WirelessHART network called the Network Manager: an advanced digital algorithm usually executed by the network gateway’s microprocessor. The purpose of the Network Manager is to manage the details of the network automatically, “tuning” various parameters for optimum reliability and data throughput. Among other tasks, the Network Manager assigns “timeslots” for individual devices to transmit, determines the frequency-hopping schedule, detects and authenticates new devices added to the network, dynamically adjusts device transmission power, and selects alternative routes between devices.

In a sense, the Network Manager in a WirelessHART network continually audits and tunes the RF system in an attempt to maximize reliability. The Network Manager’s functionality does not substitute for good planning during the design phase of the WirelessHART network, but it does eliminate the need for a human technician or engineer to continuously monitor the network’s performance and make the small adjustments necessary to compensate for changing conditions. When changes occur in a WirelessHART network that cannot be compensated by the Network Manager, the real-time statistics provided by the Network Manager are invaluable to the technician or engineer assigned to update the network.


Reprinted from "Lessons In Industrial Instrumentation" by Tony R. Kuphaldt – under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License.

Wireless for Safety

Wireless systems may be useful to enhancing the safety profile within a factory operation. These systems can be used to prevent injury through improved communication and enhanced situational awareness within the factory. Wireless safety systems are used in many applications including those designed to prevent chemical handling mishaps, avoid heavy equipment accidents such as “struck-by, and back-over” incidents, prevent falls through active position monitoring and safety interconnects, provide situational awareness within confined spaces, and improve safety for non-employees.

Along with adaption of wireless sensor networks for industrial automation, there are more applications of wireless technology created by users after they are more familiar and comfortable with the wireless technology. Also because of the strong benefits of wireless applications that can save project execution time and cost, more and more wireless has been used for secondary or backup systems for time-critical application such as safety or control applications. Based on this movement, ISA-84 working group (WG) 8 developed a technical report on wireless for safety systems other than those of a safety integrated system (SIS), i.e., those systems with a system integrity level (SIL) rating below ten. The technical report describes the additional elements needed to be addressed when wireless technology is used in an Independent Protection Layer (IPL). Refer to the ISA technical report TR84.00.08-2017 Guidance for Application of Wireless Sensor Technology to Non-SIS Independent Protection Layers for more information.

Reprinted from "Guide to Industrial Wireless Systems Deployments" by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Get your copy here.

Analynk A75x RF Industrial Wireless DIN System

Analynk A75x
Analynk A75x
The Anaynk A75x series offers simplicity and reliability in a point to point, multipoint or wireless mesh system. One A753 transmitter can communicate with multiple A750 receivers for redundancy. A repeater can be added simply by placing in between a transmitter and receiver, no programming is required. Three radio options are available: long range 900MHz 1W, 900MHz 50mW and 2.4GHz 63mW. In addition to transmission of the industry standard 4-20mA, our transmitters can directly process thermocouples, RTD and switch states. Up to 32 inputs may be transmitted with one transmitter when the A753 is paired with our A16000 expansion module.

MODEL NUMBERS:
  • A750 Receiver
  • A750-Mod (RS232/485)
  • A753 Transmitter
  • A759 Repeater
  • A753-PL Transmitter (pulse)
  • A750-PL Reciever (pulse)
  • A753-LP Transmitter (900MHz 50mW)
  • A750-LP Receiver (900MHz 50mW)
FEATURES:
  • 35mm DIN rail mount
  • Standard 1W long range output, optional 50mW & 63mW
  • Removable 2.0dBi dipole antenna
  • DIP switch selectable channels
  • Signal Strength indicator
  • Repeaters available
  • No software required
  • Factory configured for your application
APPLICATIONS:
  • Remote 4-20mA installation
  • Redundant 4-20mA outputs
  • Temperature monitoring
  • Tank level monitoring
  • Remote switch monitor
  • Pulse transmission
  • Remote alarms
  • Rotating devices (e.g. kilns)
  • Temporary 4-20mA
For more information, contact Analynk Wireless by visiting https://analynk.com or by calling (614) 755-5091.

SensaLynk™ Single & Multi-point Wireless Transmitters, Receivers, and Repeaters

The SensaLynk™ line of industrial wireless products are designed to meet today's increasing demands for greater efficiency, higher reliability and lower cost of ownership. SensaLynk™ wireless technology supports industry standards and protocols and maximizes the flexibility of your process control system while reducing inventory and installation costs.

https://analynk.com
(614) 755-5091

HazaLynk™ Wireless Products for Hazardous Areas

The HazaLynk™ Series incorporates a wide selection of wireless hazardous area devices to suit a variety of industrial applications. The product line includes wireless instruments for hazardous areashazardous area antennas, hazardous area access point enclosures, and hazardous area RF enclosures that simplify the process of installing field instrumentation, while meeting code requirements for hazardous classified and explosive environments.

https://analynk.com
(614) 755-5091


Fresnel Zones and Industrial Wireless Connections

oilfield production site and equipment
Industrial wireless connections established outdoors across
long distances have to consider transmission path geometry.
A Fresnel zone, of which there an infinite theoretical number, is an ellipsoid shaped area extending between radio signal transmission and receiving antennas. Having a basic understanding of their impact on successful implementation of a lengthy wireless process signal connection will prove useful.

Wireless transmission of process signals in industrial settings becomes more prevalent every year, and should continue to do so for quite some time. Many installations are part of networks operating similarly to the wifi you may have in your home, with multiple points communicating via a network control scheme of some sort. The facility is flooded with signal coverage through multiple access points, so there may not be much need to consider signal propagation. This is an oversimplification, but as an operator or implementer, making the actual signal connection is probably not going to be an issue in most cases.

What about the other cases?
antennas and associated Fresnel zones and obstruction avoidance
Antennas with three Fresnel zones depicted and
obstruction that is outside the primary Fresnel zone
Courtesy Wikipedia

An extended transmission distance across an outdoor area requires more understanding of signal propagation and factors that impede successful delivery of process data from transmitter to receiver. One concept that comes into play is the Fresnel zone.

Let's avoid an overly technical approach to Fresnel zones. The purpose of this post is to provide those with limited radio expertise familiarity with the subject of Fresnel zones at a level enabling visualization of the concept, and also to recognize its potential impact on achieving a successful wireless process connection.

We often consider the transmission path between two points to be the familiar "line of sight", an unobstructed straight line between transmitter and receiver. In practice, radio frequency transmission is more accurately characterized by Fresnel zones. Being aware of the shape of the first, or primary, Fresnel zone for your application is an important element in identifying potential obstructions. A general practice is to keep the primary Fresnel zone at least 60% clear of signal obstructions, in order to maintain high wireless link performance.

There are numerous sources of Fresnel zone calculators online, but a strong recommendation to consult with your selected wireless equipment provider is in order here. Combine their expertise at applying their products with your application knowledge to leverage an effective solution.

Integrating Products Into a Complete Solution

explosion proof temperature transmitter
Explosion proof temperature transmitter, one of many
Telmar process measurement products.
Analynk Wireless manufactures equipment and crafts solutions for establishing wireless connections between process measurement and control locations, across the room, across the property, around the globe. As part of the company's product matrix, their Telmar branded products provide measurement points for complete application solutions. A review of the Telmar products.
  • Pressure to current transmitters
  • Current to pressure transmitters
  • Pressure to voltage or current
  • Current or voltage to pressure
  • Voltage to current
  • Current to voltage
  • RTD
  • Thermocouple
  • Slidewire
  • Tachometer
  • Power supplies
  • LCD digital meters
  • LED Indicators
  • Signal alarms
The Analynk application team can design and fabricate a complete package solution for your process measurement or wireless connectivity requirement. Share your ideas and challenges with the wireless and process measurement experts, leveraging your own knowledge and experience for an effective project outcome.

Wireless Temperature Monitoring System Assures Safety in Firefighter Training Facility

firefighting training building burn building
Firefighters training at a burn building
Courtesy Fire Facilities
Fire Facilities designs and manufactures live firefighting training towers and buildings, referred to as burn buildings. Firefighters train in these structures honing their personal skills and developing team strategies for combating fires under live burn conditions. The training, because of the live fire in the structure, can be dangerous. Procedures and equipment are in place to minimize the risk posed to the training professionals.

Analynk Wireless designed and manufactures part of the safety and monitoring system for the Fire Facilities training structures. The system is suitable for worldwide use, as are the training structures. Sixteen temperature monitoring locations are established in the structure and monitored using the pyrometer developed by Analynk. The monitoring station provides alarm notification if the temperature in any of the monitored zones exceeds the level at which trainees can safely enter the area.
  • Monitor up to 16 channels of thermocouple input
  • Local temperature display on touchscreen HMI
  • Audible and flashing local alarm, plus relay contacts for connection of external devices
  • WiFi connection to smart phone or tablet for remote viewing of all operating information
  • Data logging of each channel to USB drive
  • Cloud connection for view access from anywhere with an internet connection
  • Email and text alerts
  • Monitoring station has NEMA 4 rating and is suitable for installation and operation in environments to -40 degrees
The Fire Facilities Pyrometer is another example of Analynk's capabilities in designing and building engineered products for specific applications. Share your process control product development challenges with the experienced professionals at Analynk, combining your concept with their design and engineering expertise to develop top flight product solutions.
pyrometer fire facilities

Industrial Wireless Communications Using a Single Transmitter and Multiple Receivers

water treatment plant
Water treatment plant
In planning a wireless installation for connecting process measurement instruments and equipment to monitoring and control stations, keep in mind that it is not necessary to maintain a one-to-one relationship among receivers and transmitters. A transmitter broadcasts the process signal on a designated channel. All the receiving devices set to that channel will receive the 256 bit encrypted signal. Each can decrypt the signal and convert the value to a common industrial analog signal for use as needed. The key takeaway is to recognize that once the process signal is transmitted, you have the ability to receive and use the signal anywhere within range of the transmitter. Effective range can extend from a few feet to several miles.

The beneficial applications for industrial wireless are limited only by your imagination and ingenuity. Share your ideas and challenges with the industrial wireless experts at Analynk, combining your own process knowledge with their application expertise to develop an effective solution.
wireless industrial communications with multiple receivers and one transmitter

Cooling Towers: Operating Principles and Systems

Industrial process cooling tower on building rooftop
Cooling towers are found in a wide range of sizes
and configurations
The huge, perfectly shaped cylindrical towers stand tall amidst a landscape, with vapor billowing from their spherical, open tops into the blue sky. Such an image usually provokes a thought related to nuclear power or a mysterious energy inaccessible to the millions of people who drive by power plants every day. In reality, cooling towers – the hyperboloid structures most often associated with the aforementioned nuclear power plants – are essential, process oriented tools that serve as the final step in removing heat from a process or facility. The cooling towers at power plants serve as both an adjuster of a control variable essential to the process and also as a fascinating component of the process behind power creation. The importance and applicability of cooling towers is extensive, making them fundamentally useful for industrial operations in power generation, oil refining, petrochemical plants, commercial/industrial HVAC, and process cooling.

In principle, a cooling tower involves the movement of water through a series of different parts or sections to eventually result in the reduction of its heat content and temperature. Water heated by the process operation is pumped through pipes to reach the tower, and then gets sprayed through nozzles or other distribution means onto the ‘fill’ of the tower, reducing the flow of water to appropriate levels; this maximizes the amount of surface area for contact between water and air. Electric motor driven fans pull air into the tower, and when the air meets the water, a percentage of the water evaporates, carrying heat from the water to the air and resulting in the water being cooled. The cooled water then gets transferred back to the process-related equipment, and absorbs heat again, allowing for the cycle to repeat. The process and associated dispersion of heat allows for the cooling tower to be classified as a heat rejection device, resulting in waste heat being rejected to the atmosphere. Towers depend on either evaporation to remove the process heat (open loop) or solely on air (closed loop), without evaporation, to reduce the water temperature.

Thanks to their range of applications, cooling towers vary in size from the monolithic structures utilized by power plants to small rooftop units. Removing the heat from the water used in cooling systems allows for the recycling of the heat transfer fluid back to the process or equipment that is generating heat. This cycle of heat transfer enables heat generating processes to remain stable and secure. The cooling provided by an evaporative tower allows for the amount of supply water to be vastly lower than the amount which would be otherwise needed. No matter whether the cooling tower is small or large, the components of the tower must function as an integrated system to ensure both excellent performance and longevity of use. Additionally, understanding elements which drive performance - variable flow capability, potential HVAC ‘free cooling’, the splash type fill versus film type fill, drift eliminators, nozzles, fans, and driveshaft characteristics - is essential to the success of the cooling tower and its use in both industrial and commercial settings.

So, the next time an imposing tower cracks the horizon underneath a pillar of drifting vapor, imagine all the components inside working together in a beautifully aligned system towards a common industrial goal. Such is the ingenuity of technology.

Analynk Wireless manufactures wireless communications equipment that can be used to establish radio connections between remote located cooling tower monitoring equipment and central control stations. Fan motor current, air or fluid flow and temperature characteristics, and outdoor air conditions are just some of the cooling tower performance parameters that can be monitored.

Refractometry Applications in Industry

In-line refractometer for industrial processing
In-line refractometer for industrial processing
Courtesy Electron Machine
Refractometry, a combination of physics, materials, and chemistry, is the process which measures the composition of known substances by means of calculating their respective refractive indexes (RI). RIs are evaluated via a refractometer, a device which measures the curve, or refraction, resulting when the wavelength of light moves from the air into and through a tested substance. The unitless number given by the refractometer, usually between 1.3000 and 1.7000, is the RI. The composition of substances is then determined when the RI is compared to a standard curve specific to the material of the substance. There are also four separate types of refractometers: digital, analog, lab, and inline process. Although refractometry can measure a variety of substances, including gases and solids, the most common category of known substances to calculate are liquids; the inline process refractometer is used to quantify the makeup of liquids.

The ultimate focus of industrial refractometry is to describe what is in a final product or output of a process step. A field which relies directly on the results of refractometry is gemology. Gemological refractometry is crucial for accurately identifying the gemstones being classified, whether the gemstones are opaque, transparent, or translucent.

Other common examples of industrial refractometry uses are measuring the salinity of water to determine drinkability; figuring beverages’ ratios of sugar content versus other sweeteners or water; setting eye-glass prescriptions; understanding the hydrocarbon content of motor fuels; totaling plasma protein in blood samples; and quantifying the concentration of maple syrup. Regarding fuels, refractometry scrutinizes the possible output of energy and conductivity, and for drug-testing purposes, refractometry measures the specific gravity, or the density, of human urine. Regarding food, refractometry has the ability to measure the glucose in fruit during the fermentation process. Because of this, those in food services know when fruit is at peak ripeness and, in turn, also understand the most advantageous point in the fruit’s “lifetime” to put it on the market.

The determination of the substance composition of the product examples listed above all speak to the purpose of quality control and the upholding of standardized guidelines; consumers rely on manufacturers not only to produce these products but also to produce these products consistently and identically every single time. Therefore, the success of commercialism, etc. is dependent on maintaining the standards for the composition of substances, i.e. industrial refractometry.

Equipment manufacturers have developed numerous refractometer configurations tailored to specific use and application. Each has a set of features making it the advantageous choice for its intended application. Product specialists can be invaluable sources of information and assistance to potential refractometer users seeking to match the best equipment to their application or process.

Analynk manufactures wireless communications equipment to connect process measurement instruments with remotely located process monitors and controllers. Their products enable customers to make connections across the room, across the plant, across the highway, and around the globe.

Analynk's Telmar Brand of Process Control Products

enclosed industrial process controller
Telmar enclosed 2-wire transmitter
Analynk Wireless, in addition to wireless process signal transmitters, receivers, and repeaters, manufactures a broad line of industrial process control products under the Telmar brand.

  • 2-Wire Transmitters with AC, DC, mA, slidewire, RTD, or tachometer inputs. General purpose enclosure is standard, with options for others to meet any rated environment.
  • 4-Wire Transmitters with dozens of combinations of input and output signals. Alarm outputs available as option.
  •  Signal Alarms that accommodate inputs from thermocouple, DC current, DC voltage, RTD, AC voltage, AC current, tachometer, slidewire, or strain gauge.
  • Pneumatic Transmitters for pressure to current, current to pressure, pressure to voltage, and voltage to pressure applications.
  • Tachometer Transmitters
  • Explosion Proof Transmitters with or without local indicator for thermocouple or RTD input.
    • industrial process transmitter RTD with explosion proof enclosure and display
      RTD transmitter with explosion proof enclosure and display
  • Indicators and Meters with general purpose or explosion proof enclosures in loop powered or external powered versions.
  • Sensor Assemblies for general, corrosive, or explosion proof applications. Thermocouple or RTD.
The Telmar brand provides complementary products for wired process control applications, or can be supplemented by Analynk's wireless products to provide wireless connectivity between point of measurement and point of control.

Reach out to Analynk with your process control challenges, combining your process knowledge with their product expertise to develop effective solutions.

Explosion Proof Antennas For Wireless Communications in Hazardous Industrial Settings

explosion proof antenna for industrial wifi wireless communications
CTX Series Explosion Proof Antenna
Analynk
Wireless connections between process measuring and control devices brings several benefits to an industrial operation. The signal cable free installation saves valuable time and space, reduces damage exposure, and simplifies process equipment layout modifications.

Implementing wireless communications in hazardous areas, whether through WiFi or other radio frequency channels, poses a unique set of challenges to successful implementation. Points of network access and other transmission and receiving equipment will require a level of isolation and hardening appropriate for the hazardous industrial environment. Specialized explosion proof enclosures can house the needed equipment, but antennas must extend outside these metal enclosures and into the hazardous environment in order to transmit and receive process signals. This imposes rigorous requirements on antenna design and construction.

Analynk Wireless manufactures patented UL listed hazardous area explosion proof antennas for industrial installations.  Their CTX and CTM series antennas carry an array of third party approvals and are suitable for use in a broad range of hazardous environments. Models can accommodate WiFi and other RF communications across frequency bands commonly utilized in industrial settings, as well as cellular and satellite communications.

Data sheets for the CTX and CTM Series antennas are included below for more detail. Share your wireless communication challenges and application questions with the experts at Analynk and work together to produce the best solutions.

Analynk Further Expands Line of Hazardous Area Wireless Access Point Enclosures

hazardous area wireless access point enclosure with antennas
New AP608 Explosion Proof Access Point Enclosure
For Meru AP-1020e
Analynk Wireless has added three new entries to their line of wireless access point enclosures for use in hazardous areas. Each enclosure is shipped ready for installation of your access point device, with hazardous area antennas, antenna cables, and custom access point mounting bracket included.

Analynk access point enclosures are preconfigured to house a specific manufacturer and model number access point. Review the entire product offering and see the long list of accommodated access points. If you want to use an access point not shown on the list, contact  Analynk for a solution.

The new models and their matching access point.
The hyperlinks above will open data sheets for the respective units.

Analynk manufactures a diverse array of equipment utilized in establishing wireless connections between industrial process control devices. Share your wireless connectivity challenges with the experts at Analynk and get effective solutions.

New Hazardous Area Wireless Access Point Enclosures

Wireless Access point enclosure for hazardous area
Model AP 412 Hazardous Area Access Point Enclosure
Analynk Wireless has added two new entries to their line of wireless access point enclosures for use in hazardous areas. Each access point enclosure is shipped ready for installation of your access point device, with hazardous area antennas, cables, mounting bracket, and antenna cables included.

Analynk access point enclosures are preconfigured to house a specific manufacturer and model number access point. Review the product offering and see the long list of accommodated access points. If you want to use an access point not shown on the list, contact Analynk for a solution.

The new models are designed to house the Cisco 2802E and 3802E Dual Band Access Points. Data sheets for both are included below.

Analynk manufactures a diverse array of equipment utilized in establishing wireless connections between industrial process control devices. Share your wireless connectivity challenges with the experts at Analynk and get effective solutions.




Hazardous Area RF Antenna Opens Up Installation Possibilities

Analynk Hazardous Area Antenna
Many industrial process control operations can benefit from wireless connections between measuring and control devices. The absence of cables saves space, reduces potential for damage, and simplifies modifications to the process equipment layout. Implementing wireless communications in hazardous areas, whether through WiFi or other radio frequency channels, presents a particular set of challenges to successful implementation. Points of network access and other transmission and receiving equipment can require a level of isolation and hardening appropriate for the hazardous environment. Specialized enclosures can house the needed equipment, but antennas must extend outside metal enclosures and into the hazardous environment in order to function. This imposes rigorous requirements on antenna design and construction.

Analynk Wireless provides patented hazardous area explosion proof antennas for industrial installations.  Their CTX and CTM series antennas carry an array of third party approvals and are suitable for use in a broad range of hazardous environments. Models can accommodate WiFi and other RF communications across frequency bands commonly utilized in industrial settings, as well as cellular and satellite communications.

Data sheets for the CTX and CTM Series antennas are included below for more detail. Share your wireless communication challenges and application questions with the experts at Analynk and work together to produce the best solutions.


Hazardous Area Wireless Equipment Enclosures Ease the Path to Implementation

hazardous area wireless equipment enclosure with explosion proof antenna
Analynk hazardous area wireless equipment enclosures
are preconfigured for antenna connection.
Extending or establishing wireless connections in hazardous industrial environments presents a unique set of challenges. The equipment must be housed in an enclosure appropriately rated for the environment. Additionally, the antenna must extend outside the hazardous area rated equipment enclosure in order to properly function. The antenna must also carry a suitable rating for the hazardous area and provide an approved mating to the enclosure to preserve the safety integrity of the installation.

Analynk Wireless, innovators in the industrial wireless arena, provide a series of enclosures suitable for Class 1 Division 1 Groups C&D locations, as well as Class 1 Zone 1 applications. The enclosures are preconfigured to accommodate Analynk's hazardous area antenna, which provides access to a range of frequencies that include radio, cellular, and satellite communications.

The company also provides hazardous area rated enclosures for many popular industrial WiFi access points, preconfigured with antennas, equipment mounting bracket, and connection cables.

Share your industrial wireless communications challenges with the experts at Analynk Wireless. Combining your process expertise with their knowledge of wireless communications will produce the best solution.



Understanding Telecommunications Terminology

satellite orbiting earth for industrial process control wireless communications
Industrial wireless communications can include satellites
If you are delving into wireless communications for process control operations and expect to go beyond the use of industrial Wi-Fi, you are likely to encounter some concepts and lexicon that may be unfamiliar. A source of recognized standard definitions for industry specific terms will serve as a useful tool for understanding the specifics of radio communications.

Federal Standard 1037C, entitled Telecommunications: Glossary of Telecommunication Terms was issued by the General Services Administration late in the last century. It was superseded in 2001 by American National Standard T1.523-2001, Telecom Glossary 2000, published by Alliance for Telecommunications Industry Solutions commonly known as ATIS). The current version of the ATIS Telecom Glossary is available for use by the public. Find the glossary website, with its search engine, and either type a term to search for in the box or browse the extensive listings in alphabetical order. It's easy to use and can help you sort out the meanings of some industry specific terms.

Analynk Wireless is a wireless communications equipment provider to the industrial process control sector. Contact the application specialists at Analynk and share your wireless communication challenges.

glossary of telecommunications terms
Screen shot of the glossary, showing search box in upper left area